Drawings > The Gospel According To St. Luke

The Baptism of Christ (After Verrochio and Pasolini)
Charcoal on Paper, Cardboard
2016
$2600
The Annunciation
Charcoal on Paper, Cardboard
2016
$2000
Baptism of Christ Detail 1
Charcoal on Paper, Cardboard
2016
Baptism of Christ Detail 2
Charcoal on Paper, Cardboard
2016
Baptism of Christ Detail 3
Charcoal on Paper, Cardboard
2016
The Birth of Christ
Charcoal on Paper, Cardboard
2016
$2500
The Birth of Christ Detail 1
Charcoal on Paper, Cardboard
2016
Calming the Storm
Charcoal on Paper, Cardboard
2016
$3000
Calming the Storm Detail 1
Charcoal on Paper, Cardboard
2016
Calming the Storm Detail 2
Charcoal on Paper, Cardboard
2016

This series of drawings was inspired after the film, “The Gospel According to St. Matthew” by Pier Paolo Pasolini. The immediacy and rawness of the film left a lingering impression upon me. I initially watched it right before finishing graduate school. In the proceeding months, while attempting to get my feet underneath me, I found it increasingly difficult to make work. Then this past fall while on residency something arose in me; I discovered in my solitude a quiet desire to reconnect with my heroes. One night I decided to visit the residents’ library and flip through the books. I allowed myself the space to be piqued by whichever books I was intuitively drawn to. This was a luxury I hadn’t indulged in a few years. In grad school, all my decisions felt subject to scrutiny. There alone in the library that night I passionately piled up the books of my heroes: Caravaggio, Masaccio, Michelangelo, Piero della Francesca, Fra Angelico, and the list went on. That night while lying in bed, the thought came to me to work my way through the Gospel of St. Luke in pictures. Like Pasolini, I would keep things raw and simple. The process was to read a portion of the scriptures and then start drawing. I could reference the compositions of the artists I was looking at, but it was best just to work in a progressive and intuitive fashion. Sometimes I would reference the master works with the dress, and sometimes I would make the dress contemporary. Sometimes people I had lunch with would inspire the figures, and sometimes they were appropriated from famous pictures. These large-scale drawings are the result of my endeavor to negotiate a meeting place between the lineage of the masters, the cultural climate of contemporary art, and sincere religious devotion.